Cleansing Fire

Defending Truth and Tradition in the Roman Catholic Church

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A picture is worth a thousand words

October 17th, 2012, Promulgated by Dr. K

Below is a collage of photographs detailing the 33-year tenure of Bishop Matthew Clark, and the downward spiral of the Diocese of Rochester that took place during his reign. Have fun identifying the various events and personalities. To see the full size collage, click on the image below.

Click on the image to enlarge

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11 Responses to “A picture is worth a thousand words”

  1. avatar annonymouse says:

    Good doctor, nice work. Wow, much of this made me wince. The picnic table Mass especially. Not sure why the vocations poster made it in, other than symbolic of the dearth of priestly vocations.

    To be fair, it does seem to me that perhaps you’ve devoted just a bit too many “column inches” to “liturgical prancing with the stars” – aside from frequent appearances at the Cathedral, such prancing would (I hope) still be foreign to most of the faithful in the diocese, but perhaps I’m mistaken.

  2. avatar RochChaCha says:

    Quite eye-opening when you see so many abuses at one time. Pretty sad when you look at this and take note of just how awful the state of our diocese is today.

  3. avatar raymondfrice says:

    Bishop Clark has moved on. Shouldn’t we ???

  4. avatar Hopefull says:

    Actually, Raymond, no. There are many people who have previously been afraid to point out the abuses in their parishes, ignored by Bishop Clark. They feared everything from having their parish closed to having their parents denied a funeral, or a child their First Communion. Perhaps it isn’t logical, but it was real. Someday, when the book is written on Bishop Clark’s 33 years at the helm of the Rochester Diocese, Cleansing Fire will be one of the prime archival sources. Now, in the interregnum, would be a good time to bring out what has been hidden in order that there can be meaningful closure. And documented history.

  5. avatar raymondfrice says:

    Dear Hopefull:

    “Now, in the interregnum, would be a good time to bring out what has been hidden in order that there can be meaningful closure. And documented history .”

    If this is the case, and some DOR Catholics have not had an opportunity to be heard, by all means some writer from this blog ought to set up a forum here so that hurtful situations can have some light shed on them. There are many different kinds of abuse. Sex abuse is not the only form of abuse but it is the most serious and one in the limelight right now. There are other forms of abuse such as emotional and psychological which are undoubtably much more common and may be one of the “hidden” causes of people becoming inactive in the Church.
    A prime examle of this form of abuse might be the embarassment and discomfort that people have been subject to when celebrants (etc) have subjected their congregations to highly questionable liturgies, suggestive altar dancing, and being solicited for money for questionable causes.

  6. avatar Richard Thomas says:

    I worry that after a while,abuses will be perceived as themo.

  7. avatar Richard Thomas says:

    I am curious who formed the bishop’s view of Catholocism. He must have had these ideas on seminary and kept under the radar while at the North American Seminary

  8. avatar raymondfrice says:

    Richard: “I am curious who formed the bishop’s view of Catholocism. He must have had these ideas on seminary and kept under the radar while at the North American Seminary”.

    Check who his professors were, what he read, what was taught , who the “in” theologians were at the time,and who his friends were. No one studying in Rome for 4 years or functions as a staff member of the North American College stays under the radar. They would have a network of support from their peers and administration. His theology is viewed by many as just a variation of orthodoxy on the flexible side of the bell curve.

    PS: check your resources to find what locals and nationals studied in Rome.

  9. avatar Nerina says:

    Regarding liturgical dancing – it shows up about once a year in our church.

  10. avatar raymondfrice says:

    “Regarding liturgical dancing – it shows up about once a year in our church.”

    Whenever I see liturgical dancing, I think of Isidora Duncan and her scarf wrapped around the rear wheel of her car!!

  11. avatar cbalducc says:

    I’m from the South, so I’m not aware of what’s happening “on the ground” up there, but isn’t the decline in the Diocese of Rochester reflective of what’s happening in other dioceses in the Northeast? Most baptized Catholics up there seem to be just staying at home Sunday mornings. At most, they are Christmas & Easter Catholics or, in the words of a now-deceased priest I once knew who was a Brooklyn native, they only go to church when they are “hatched, matched, and dispatched”. God bless and keep you!


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