Cleansing Fire

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DOR Catholic High Schools – 1979 vs 2010

April 3rd, 2011, Promulgated by Mike

In Friday’s post we took a look at parish- and diocesan-operated Catholic elementary schools in the Diocese of Rochester, along with their 1979 and 2010 enrollments. Today’s post takes a similar look at our Catholic high schools.

Once again, all the enrollment data is from either the 1979 or the 2010 Official Catholic Directory (except as noted) and is claimed to be accurate as of January 1st of the appropriate year.

DOR Monroe County Catholic High Schools
  School                    City/Town   1979 Students  2010 Students
  Aquinas Institute (1)     Rochester             706            887
  Bishop Kearney (1)        Irondequoit         1,760            535
  Cardinal Mooney (1)       Greece              1,265       (Closed)
  McQuaid Jesuit (1)        Brighton              770            846
  Nazareth Academy (1) (3)  Rochester             730            230
  Our Lady of Mercy (1)     Brighton              770            650
  St. Agnes (1)             Brighton              500       (Closed)
Totals – Monroe County                          6,501          3,148
DOR Catholic High Schools Outside Monroe County
  Notre Dame (1)            Elmira                595            222
  De Sales High School (2)  Geneva                215             95
Totals – Outside Monroe County                    810            317
Totals – All DOR Catholic High Schools          7,311          3,465
Notes:
 (1) Privately owned and operated
 (2) Owned and operated by DOR
 (3) 2010 enrollment from newspaper accounts;
     all other enrollment numbers from OCD

(A pdf version of the above data – in a larger font size – is available here.)

As can be seen, we have lost 2 of our 9 Catholic high schools (it would become 3 in June of 2010 with the closing of Nazareth Academy) and 3,846 (52.6%) of our Catholic high school students during the first 31 years of Matthew Clark’s tenure as Bishop of Rochester.

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13 Responses to “DOR Catholic High Schools – 1979 vs 2010”

  1. avatar Abaccio says:

    What is that old school that’s over near U of R on River Road? Wasn’t that a Catholic School at one point?

  2. avatar Mike says:

    Abaccio,

    That’s the old St. Agnes High. See here, about half way down.

  3. avatar Abaccio says:

    It’s a lovely facility now…I went in there for a couple of shows in the past. I’m amazed by the decline of Kearney.

  4. avatar Mike says:

    Abaccio,

    That’s why Kearney rents out so much of its building. There’s been a Jewish yeshiva there for several years now and a new charter school will open in the south wing this fall.

  5. At Elmira’s Notre Dame, I believe that some board members are not Catholic. Is that usual?

  6. avatar Anonymous says:

    For many parents Catholic high school tuition is off the radar screen, especially if you have more than one child going. McQuaid’s tuition is around 10K and the others are not that far behind. The tuition has gone up exponentially since 1979. I know this because I have been teaching in Catholic high schools for more than 36 years–in this diocese.
    As the salaries for teachers increased ( along with benefits)–and believe me they are still quite low in comparison to our public school colleagues–in an effort to keep qualified, experienced teachers and to pay them a just, living wage, tuition had to go up. This, of course, made sending children to Catholic high school very, very difficult for many working class families. I am really surprized that the high schools are still doing as well as they are.

  7. avatar Anonymous says:

    And Gretchen, it may not be usual, but it happens.

  8. avatar Anonymous says:

    Re: Bishop Kearney HS–it became very clear by the late 80’s and into the 90’s that the quality of education there had slipped considerably–for a number of reasons. A one-time huge Kearney supporter ( and alum) sent his children to other Catholic high schools in the diocese, even though the family lived closer to Kearney than to the other schools.Each Catholic High School is independently operated and decisions are made not by diocesan officials but by the Boards of Trustees , Presidents and Principals.

  9. avatar Mike says:

    Gretchen,

    Those schools are independent and can invite anyone they want to sit on their boards. As Anon. 8:17 said, it’s unusual but it happens.

    Also, at some schools at least, teachers do not need to be Catholic, either at the elementary or high school level – although I’ve never heard of a non-Catholic religion teacher.

  10. avatar Abaccio says:

    As I understand it, a Theo teacher at DeSales was let go a number of years ago for teaching things that were…not Catholic

  11. avatar Mike says:

    Abaccio,

    I’m surprised a dissenting DOR teacher got the boot. He/she must have strayed awfully far off the reservation for that to happen here.

  12. avatar Abaccio says:

    I could be mistaken in my old age, but that is how I remember the situation. I thought DeSales was run by a lay board, not the DoR?

  13. avatar Mike says:

    Abaccio,

    The 1979 OCD lists DeSales (and no other DOR school) under its “High Schools, Diocesan” heading.

    The 2010 edition just lists all the high schools together and says that DeSales has 95 students and is “incorporated under the laws of the State of New York” (which explains the board) but it doesn’t say who owns the ‘stock’ of the corporation (I suspect it’s DOR). Also, the “Statistical Overview” section for 2010 lists only one high school as “diocesan/parish” and shows 95 students attending.

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