Cleansing Fire

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Chrism Mass ’11

April 20th, 2011, Promulgated by Dr. K

From the Catholic Courier:

tick tock… tick tock… 2012.

The Mahony/Clark/Hubbard era is quickly coming to an end.

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24 Responses to “Chrism Mass ’11”

  1. avatar Anonymous says:

    Is that Archbishop Gomez (of Opus Dei) among other bishops in the midst of a liturgical dance and procession?

    http://youtu.be/YL9tmkBS9K0

    2 Samuel 6:14

  2. avatar Anonymous says:

    Isn’t it cruel to make those girls dance in so much fabric? Where are the bare shoulders and scoop-necked shiny tanks tops of Chrism Masses past?

  3. avatar Ink says:

    Anon 6:24, of course not! It’s a return to the old styles of full skirts and a semblance of modesty. Plus, you just feel fancier with a bigger, fluffier skirt to spin around. And don’t you just love their liturgical colours? White AND red.

    …so much for my Lenten promise of trying to have more charity.

  4. avatar Louis E. says:

    Are the girls aspiring to the Popess-cy,with those colors?

    Hubbard’s resignation is not due until Halloween of ’13.

  5. avatar LoyalViews says:

    At least they’re wearing clothes at this one….most of the time you see scantly-clad things running around with hoola-hopps spinning around their necks and ears.

  6. avatar Dr. K says:

    Is that Archbishop Gomez (of Opus Dei) among other bishops in the midst of a liturgical dance and procession?

    Wasn’t this during his first or second month on the job as head of LA? It was already tamer than the Mahony version in previous years.

  7. avatar Anonymous says:

    Dr. K – but it was still there. If he thought, as Cardinal Arinze asserts that liturgical dance is inappropriate, he could have prohibited it. Yet, he comes from a culture that is much “warmer” in so many ways than Rochester…

  8. avatar Dr. K says:

    And who is saying he won’t down the road?

  9. avatar annonymouse says:

    “Give praise with tambourines and dance, praise him with flutes and strings.
    Give praise with crashing cymbals, praise him with sounding cymbals.
    Let everything that has breath give praise to the LORD! Hallelujah!”
    Psalm 150: 4-6 (NAB)

    It seems to me that there are many ways in which we may express our praise and worship of the Lord.

  10. avatar Bill B. says:

    My goodness. I forgot about that Psalm. I shouldn’t have.
    Ties in with “…Give thanks with a greatful heart…” Thanks annonymouse.

  11. avatar Bruce says:

    Is “annonymouse” familiar with what Cardinal Arinze said about liturgical dance? It would appear not. Ignorance is obviously not bliss, nor is it worship.

  12. avatar Bruce says:

    It would appear that “annonymouse” is not familiar with the actual rubrics of the liturgy, and prefers to remain a “magesterium of one”. Ignorance is not bliss, nor is it worship.

  13. avatar Nerina says:

    It seems to me that there are many ways in which we may express our praise and worship of the Lord.

    And that is the problem, Annonymouse. While it might seem to you that there are many ways to offer praise, the Church has spoken on liturgical dance in our Rite and in our culture. One of the main problems with liturgical dance is that dance is not associated with the sacred in our culture. In fact, it is most often associated with secular activities (many of which border on vulgar and profane). Further, introducing dance into the Liturgy mentally distracts the congregation. I know when dance has been used in our church, there is a collective “oh, isn’t that sweet.” It’s hard not to have dance turn into a performance and it’s hard to remain focused on participating in the re-presentation of the Sacrifice at Calvary.

    I have often heard the pro-dance argument that the dancers are offering their gifts and fully participating to which I respond, “what about those who have no outward gifts? Those who can’t dance? Those who can’t sing? If they show no external participation, is their presence null and void?” I’m all for “full participation” but I also know that the idea is used to give cover to any number of liturgical abuses. Why do you think so many churches have an excessive number of EMHCs?

    On a positive note, I think the dancers’ costumes are much more appropriate. I am still bothered, however, that children are used in advancing a liturgical agenda. It’s hard not to see a calculated approach in all of it knowing that people are less likely to raise an objection against children “just bringing their gifts to the altar.”

  14. avatar Dr. K says:

    “Give praise with tambourines and dance, praise him with flutes and strings.
    Give praise with crashing cymbals, praise him with sounding cymbals.
    Let everything that has breath give praise to the LORD! Hallelujah!”
    Psalm 150: 4-6 (NAB)

    It seems to me that there are many ways in which we may express our praise and worship of the Lord.

    Did Jews perform liturgical dance in worship services at their Synagogues?

  15. avatar annonymouse says:

    Bruce – I love Cardinal Arinze and would love to see him as our next Holy Father. However, he is not our bishop, nor is he a member of the national conference of bishops, which governs the liturgy in our country under canon law. So while I value his opinion, it’s certainly not binding on liturgy either in the USA or in our diocese.

    So who’s ignorant?

  16. avatar annonymouse says:

    Actually, Cardinal Arinze’s opinion as Prefect of the Congregation for Sacred Worship, is not to be disregarded.

    Nerina, with all due respect, please point me to where the Church has definitively (or otherwise) spoken on liturgical dance in our (or other) cultures. The 1975 document prescribes conditions for liturgical dance, the second of which seems to leave it to the national conference of bishops. If the USCCB or its predecessor has weighed in on liturgical dance, I’ve missed it.

    If I were bishop, I would not allow liturgical dance – if for no other reason than it has the effect of introducing disunity into the flock. Some folks like it, some are offended by it (many for no other reason than it violates the perceived “rules”). It splits the people of God who should have much better things to do than argue over dance in the liturgy.

    If all of the energy spent planning and executing liturgical dance, on the one hand, and then the energy and time wasted arguing over it afterward, on the other hand, were devoted to, for example, catechesis, evangelization and serving the poor, think of what a Church we would have!

    I think it’s important to realize that the Mass, indeed all of the Church’s sacraments, are not ends in themselves, but rather means to the desired end, which is the sanctification and salvation of souls. The liturgy is intended to bring us together as God’s people so that we can then go forth and be the presence of Christ in the world. Instead, we go forth in judgment over this or that aspect of the liturgy (the liturgical dancers were dressed scantily, the priest didn’t shine his shoes, there was a female altar server, etc., whatever) and we completely miss the point of our having been there. The liturgy isn’t about our own personal expression of faith (i.e. dance) nor is it primarily about our own personal sanctification…it’s about constituting us as the people of God, UNITED (see that word in “communion”?) to go serve the world as Christ’s representative.

  17. avatar Dr. K says:

    So while I value his opinion, it’s certainly not binding on liturgy either in the USA or in our diocese.

    Read the following: http://www.ewtn.com/library/CURIA/CDWDANCE.HTM

    “However, the same criterion and judgment cannot be applied in the western culture.

    Here dancing is tied with love, with diversion, with profaneness, with unbridling of the senses: such dancing, in general, is not pure.

    For that reason it cannot be introduced into liturgical celebrations of any kind whatever: that would be to inject into the liturgy one of the most desacralized and desacralizing elements; and so it would be equivalent to creating an atmosphere of profaneness which would easily recall to those present and to the participants in the celebration worldly places and situations. “

    The is from the Congregation for Divine Worship.

    And here is what the National Conference of Catholic Bishops said in 1982, see same link above toward bottom:

    “all dancing, (ballet, children’s gesture as dancing, the clown liturgy) are not permitted to be “introduced into liturgical celebrations of any kind whatever.””

  18. avatar Bruce says:

    Wow! Dr. K totally owned “annonymouse”. LOL

  19. avatar annonymouse says:

    “Owned”?

    Please show me something on point from either Vatican.va or from the USCCB’s web site.

    Dr. K has quoted a “newsletter” quoted by ewtn, but mysteriously it is a document that is so important that it cannot be found on the USCCB’s web site.

    Karl Keating quotes the same document, as does OurLadysWarriors. It would be good, and instructive, if we could actually see the document that folks are finding “authoritative”! Perhaps this document, which predates even the release of the Code of Canon Law, never existed?!

    No one here will like this, but it doesn’t seem like either Rome or the USCCB is finding this an egregious enough offense to intrude on the authority of the local ordinary.

    If someone can find something a bit more, shall we say, convincing, then I’ll own up to being “owned.”

  20. avatar Scott W. says:

    So, basically we are back to “Please don’t eat the daisies”.

  21. avatar Dr. K says:

    Dr. K has quoted a “newsletter” quoted by ewtn, but mysteriously it is a document that is so important that it cannot be found on the USCCB’s web site.

    Karl Keating quotes the same document, as does OurLadysWarriors. It would be good, and instructive, if we could actually see the document that folks are finding “authoritative”! Perhaps this document, which predates even the release of the Code of Canon Law, never existed?!

    Unless Notitiae is available online somewhere, you’d have to look it up in the print edition.

    No one here will like this, but it doesn’t seem like either Rome or the USCCB is finding this an egregious enough offense to intrude on the authority of the local ordinary.

    Not a fan of the argument that because something isn’t punished that it isn’t a problem.

  22. avatar Eliza10 says:

    These girls are adorable, and modestly dressed as well. What a lovely picture they make here. But I am with Nerina: “…I am still bothered, however, that children are used in advancing a liturgical agenda. It’s hard not to see a calculated approach in all of it knowing that people are less likely to raise an objection against children “just bringing their gifts to the altar.”

  23. avatar anonymous says:

    IT’S A SHOW, ITS DISTRACTING. If they want to offer a dance up to God, they should say a prayer before their dance recital at the dance studio, not in church. People are still quiet and respectful in libraries, but not in church in the DoR.

  24. avatar Bernie says:

    In religious matters it is never a good idea to ignore tradition; necessary organic growth, yes, but not radical departure. I am of the opinion that we only need to look to tradition to see that there is no role for dancing in the Latin Rite. The closest thing to dancing in the Latin Rite of European cultures is the procession. Of course, the Church does allow for cultural variations. It would seem strange, indeed, if, for example dancing were not a part of an African ‘high’ Mass. Dancing is more integral to that culture.

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