Cleansing Fire

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What’s Your Biggest Liturgical Pet Peeve?

February 12th, 2010, Promulgated by Gen

Excluding lay preaching.

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16 Responses to “What’s Your Biggest Liturgical Pet Peeve?”

  1. avatar Gen says:

    Mine: Altar boys with crooked surplices. I just want to run up there and tug it down in back to make it even.

  2. avatar CPT Tom says:

    Choir / Musical groups up front near or in the Sanctuary. They distract from the mass and every noise or motion is a distraction.

  3. avatar Anonymous says:

    Putting on a show for the assembly when kids go off to their *separate* Liturgy of the Word.

  4. avatar Scott/Mary says:

    any woman in the sanctuary but particularly the women who wear albs

  5. Ugly vestments, and modern art.

  6. avatar Bernie says:

    Priests who start the Mass with a jovial "Good morning. Thank you for coming. Blah, blah, blah…" They then skip the Sign of the Cross and go right into the prayer.

    At Communion time, lay people retrieving the Blessed Sacrament from the Tabernacle.

    The congregation and clergy failing to bow during the creed at the words "and was made man."

    Healthy lay folks and clergy bowing to Christ in the Tabernacle rather than genuflecting. (Of course some don't do anything!)

    People who genuflect to the altar rather than bow.

    Holding hands during the Lord's Prayer –across the center aisle.

  7. avatar CPT Tom says:

    Of course some who genuflect to the altar do so because that's the LOGICAL place for the tabernacle! In my church it's right next to the entrance from the parking lot, which makes no sense at all.

    Abuse that also makes me crazy is the musicians who go into the sanctuary during the sign of the peace to shake hands with EVERYONE in the sanctuary.

  8. I agree with everything above to the nth degree.

    If for some reason I have to go to the Novus Ordo, I abhor shaking hands or being touched at the osculum pacis (see, I can't even say or write it).

    For a time I use to kneel and put my head down in my arms, then people would wedge their "paws" into mine (I guess they didn't get the hint), so I would just stare at them. So I thought, this isn't right. So now I just get up and leave until it's over and then come back.

    That's one reason going to OLV is such a relief. I'm not invaded with hordes of handshakers. I am eternally thankful that Father doesn't allow it anymore. But I will always prefer the Tridentine Latin Mass.

  9. avatar Mike says:

    Changing the words of the Mass and/or the readings to make the language "more inclusive."

    [This was the "final straw" that drove me out of my old parish 2 1/2 years ago.]

  10. avatar RochChaCha says:

    Near the end of mass when the pastor asks if John Doe is in the audience and then asks the organist to start up the Happy Birthday song to recognize a birthday. Yes, you have to be a someone special to earn a Happy Birthday performance at Mass, and yes, the priest requests that everyone join in on the song. This is all before the mass is officially over.

  11. The use of Eucharistic Prayer 5 and other such things

    (There are only 4 approved Eucharistic Prayers, so EP5 is what it's called when Fr. JustMakesItUp says Mass

  12. avatar Persis says:

    Well Done,
    While it is my understanding that the Eucharistic Prayers I-IV are the most commonly used, there are also 9 others- for use in Masses w/ children, Masses of Reconciliation, and for ?other occasions?. I do not know if there are any ?rules? as to how and when they are used, but I would imagine that it is up to the priest. Anyone know?
    While I am not arguing that some priests may change words on their own, to say anything other than EP I-IV is "liturgical abuse", I believe, is incorrect.
    You can find the ICEL documents posted at the website:

    http://catholic-resources.org/ChurchDocs/EP.htm

  13. avatar Anonymous says:

    There are Eucharistic Prayers I – IV. Eucharistic Prayer I is also called the Roman Canon and in the Tridentine Rite, it was the only Eucharistic Prayer. EP II is based on a first century EP (found in The Didache). Eucharistic Prayer III is loosely based on a EP reported in the writings of St. Justin Martyr. EP IV is completely of modern origin. There are three Eucharistic Prayers for use in Masses with children. There are two Eucharistic Prayers of Reconciliation. These are strongly suggested to be used for the penitential seasons of Advent and Lent. There are four Eucharistic Prayers for Various Needs and Occasions. It is left to the discretion of the presider whether to use any of the four. These Eucharistic Prayers were translated from the Eucharistic Prayers of the Swiss Synod which were first approved for use in French, German and Italian in the early 70's. The Latin "typica" came later.. All of the Eucharistic Prayers above are approved for use in English speaking countries. Hence, there are 13 approved Eucharistic Prayers.

  14. avatar Anonymous says:

    In addition to the above, it is strongly suggested that EP II be used for weekday liturgies, but it is not forbidden to use the prayer for Sunday liturgies. EP I, II, and III have no specified preface – the presider chooses from the many prefaces. EPII does have its own preface, but it is not required to use it. All of the other Eucharistic Prayers have their own specific prefaces which may not be substituted with others.

  15. avatar Sister Emily says:

    CHOIR, again you amuse me. People would wedge their paw in yours!!!

    I don't like it when people wear shorts to church.

    Bring their McDonalds coffee cups to snack on before communion. Also bottled water.

    Bring your children to church we understand we may hear them but don't let them run up and down the ailes or kick the pews.

    Cell phones! Someone may make the embarassing mistake to forget to turn it off but for crying out loud,DON'T ANSWER IT!!!!!!!!!!

  16. avatar Queen Starbucks says:

    What's my biggest liturgical pet-peeve?

    I'd go with cotton-headed-ninny-muggins who perpetually insist on playing "devil's advocate." For goodness sakes, the devil neither needs nor deserves an advocate.

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