Cleansing Fire

Defending Truth and Tradition in the Roman Catholic Church

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Real Midnight Masses are Hard to Find

December 19th, 2017, Promulgated by Diane Harris

Real Midnight Masses on Christmas are getting harder than ever to find. Slowly over the years, the time has crept back to 11PM, 10PM and even to 8PM!  So it is probably a short-list, but let’s try to at least list something helpful for those with a longing for the tradition of Midnight Mass. Here’s ten we’ve got so far; in alphabetical order by Church name, not necessarily by parish. Add any we are missing:

Our Lady of Victory, Rochester

Sacred Heart Cathedral, Rochester

St. Casimir, Elmira

St. James, Waverly

St. John the Evangelist, Spencerport

St. John the Evangelist, Clyde

St. Joseph, Penfield (Bp. Matano presiding)

St. Mary, Auburn

St. Mary, Canandaigua

St. Stanislaus Kostka, Rochester

Midnight Mass, Christmas Night in Bertincourt, Champagne, 1900, Armand Guéry

   Midnight Mass, Christmas Night in Bertincourt, Champagne, 1900,                                Armand Guéry

 

 

 

 

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2 Responses to “Real Midnight Masses are Hard to Find”

  1. avatar Interstate Catholic says:

    Even the Vatican starts their “midnight” mass before midnight. Started with Benedict XVI and continues with Francis.

  2. avatar militia says:

    What time can Midnight Mass begin?

    From https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/

    “As we mentioned previously, 24 December is the Vigil of Christmas, which takes precedence over the Fourth Sunday of Advent. Thus, the Fourth Sunday of Advent is not commemorated this year using the 1962 missal.

    The following day is, of course, the feast of the Nativity of our Lord, the first day of Christmas, on 25 December. A popular question in novus ordo circles is: What time does Midnight Mass begin? The novus ordo is not our concern, but if the question is about the traditional Latin Mass, the answer is clear: no earlier than midnight on 25 December. There is no permission to use the next calendar day’s propers for the traditional Latin Mass on the evening before a Sunday or holy day, even at 11 p.m.”

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