Cleansing Fire

Defending Truth and Tradition in the Roman Catholic Church

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Selected stats online for U.S. dioceses

March 6th, 2011, Promulgated by Mike

In obedience to St. Paul’s admonition to take every thought captive to the obedience of Christ (2 Corinthians 10:5), we note that FutureChurch.org has an interesting and potentially helpful statistics utility available on its site.

The data comes from the Official Catholic Directory and is a subset of what one would find in its annual issues.  This limited data is available for every diocese, archdiocese and eparchy in the United States, but only for the years 1976, 1991, 2001, 2004, 2006 and 2009.

A couple of examples follow …



The utility may be found here.

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12 Responses to “Selected stats online for U.S. dioceses”

  1. avatar Anonymous says:

    Makes one want to cry!

  2. avatar Dr. K says:

    Lincoln had 109 seminarians in 2009?! If you count every DoR seminarian since Bishop Clark began in 1979, would this number even come close to 109?

  3. avatar Mike says:

    Dr. K.,

    66 of those seminarians are religious as opposed to diocesan. Our Lady of Guadalupe Seminary (Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter) is located in the Diocese of Lincoln.

    Still, 43 diocesan seminarians is nothing to sneeze at.

  4. avatar Anonymous says:

    And there’s three times as many Catholics in Rochester. I would like to here a valid explanation from Bishop Clark or his progressive counterparts.

  5. avatar Ben Anderson says:

    I would like to here a valid explanation

    he’s given his explanation here. Whether that’s valid or not – you decide.

  6. avatar Anonymous says:

    You know what will increase vocations in Lincoln even more? LAY ADMINISTRATORS!!! It’s simple: just tell young men considering the priesthood that they need to commit to lives of holiness, go to school for 8 years, give up any chance of getting married and having their own family, be faithful to church teachings, and then after all of that they’ll be working for lay women who took a couple of courses at the local diocesan “school of theology and ministry.”

    Seriously Bishop Bruskewitz, you have no idea what you’re missing out on. Just try it and see what happens to vocations in your diocese.

  7. avatar Gen says:

    Well said, Anon. Well said.

  8. avatar Dr. K says:

    It’s simple: just tell young men considering the priesthood that they need to commit to lives of holiness, go to school for 8 years, give up any chance of getting married and having their own family, be faithful to church teachings, and then after all of that they’ll be working for lay women who took a couple of courses at the local diocesan “school of theology and ministry.”

    It’s a recipe for failure that the Diocese of Rochester has perfected.

  9. avatar BigE says:

    Is there a mis-print on the deacon stats in Rochester? 132 in 2001 to 5 in 2004? Then back up to 136 in 2006?

    Interesting that Lincoln only has 3 permanent deacons versus Rochester’s 125+.

  10. avatar Mike says:

    Good catch, BigE! I just checked my copy of the OCD and DOR had 134 Permanent Deacons in 2004.

    AFAIK, OCD data is not available from the publisher in electronic format, meaning that anyone building a database like this needs to sit at a keyboard and transcribe the data by hand – a process that almost certainly guarantees errors will creep in.

    Re Deacons: Lincoln does not have a permanent diaconate program, but I’ve never seen an explanation why this is so. (FWIW, DOL also has zero lay people running parishes.) Perhaps Bishop Bruskewitz (appointed in 1992) and his predecessor, Bishop Flavin (1967 – 1992), believe the diocese has enough priests to handle things.

    I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that the few PD’s Lincoln does have moved there from other dioceses.

  11. avatar BigE says:

    @ Mike

    From a number of blogs I’ve read it sounds like the Bishop there doesn’t endorse Permanent Deacons because:
    1) He feels they have enough priests and thus don’t need any permanent deacons.
    2) That having Permanent Deacons hurts the call to the Priesthood

    A bit of a mis-guided understanding oround the theology of the Permanent Diaconate.

    Here’s an interesting discussion: http://blog.beliefnet.com/deaconsbench/2008/10/The-leadership-of-our-diocese-is-not-supportive-of-the-permanent-diaconate.html

  12. avatar Matt says:

    I actually am with Bp. Bruskewitz on this one. I’m not a huge fan of the permanent diaconate. The US has some absurdly high percentage of the world’s permanent deacons, which should tell us something.


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